Mark 3 v 22 - 27

The actions and words of Jesus have been relayed to the religious leaders in Jerusalem and they have sent a group of experts in the Law to check up on Him. A journey of over 80 miles was a challenging one, but their verdict is highly simplistic and full of holes. These wise folk determine that Jesus is casting out demons with the power of demons! His 'bigger demon' was casting out the minor demons. Jesus is gracious enough to reply to their wild accusation, reminding these men that a kingdom fighting itself will not last long. In fact, the opposite had happened: Jesus was stronger than even the greatest of demons, had penetrated their stronghold and the conquest of Satan had begun. We can learn TWO things from the words of Jesus:

1. Jesus understands that life is a struggle between the power of evil and the power of God. He doesn't waste His time speculating about why that is and where evil comes from, but He deals with it effectively. He not only did this, but He gave others the power to do so, also. The Kingdom of God which Jesus ushered in was to be an eternal Kingdom: it didn't die with His death or even with His ascension. If we walk in the light we can purge the darkness.

2. Part of the conquest of Satan is the defeat of disease. It is vital that we remind ourselves that Jesus came not only to save souls, but to save bodies too. When someone begins to attend our fellowship who is struggling physically then we are called to pray for the healing of their body as well as their soul. The doctors and scientists who meet the challenge of conquering disease are sharing in the defeat of Satan as much as the preachers and evangelists are. The doctor and the minister are allies in God's warfare against the power of evil.

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